Blond vs Blonde

edited June 2018 in - Writing Problems
What is the correct spelling? I see both being used all the time.

Many thanks. DL.
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Comments

  • Man = blond, woman = blonde.
  • Blonde is more common in the UK. It isn't necessary to follow the man/woman rule because in English we don't differentiate (so say all my style guides and dictionaries).
  • I've always been interested in this - i think many do follow the rule, but possibly those who know French.
  • So blond for a man and blonde for a woman, or blonde for both of them?
  • Readers would see an inconsistency and might not appreciate the reason. My advice is to refer to a dictionary. A reader might do that out of curiosity and see that in English it is usual to have blonde.

    Blonde for both.
  • Thanks, BB. I'll keep it the same then.
  • Just been to look at the Pulitzer prize winner I've just been reading. The hero is blond, spelled without an E. Little Brown which I presume is American?
  • I would always use the male/female difference.
  • Blond is American.

    If you follow what's recommended in a dictionary, you avoid the dilemma of 'There was a blond/blonde hair on the…'
  • I've always used blond for male, blonde for female and thought that was the norm?
  • I wouldn't lose any sleep over it. The New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors is an essential guide for all things contentious.
  • I've always used blond for male, blonde for female and thought that was the norm?
    Me too. Same with fiance and fiancee. It seems right to me and that's how most of the places I submit to do it.
  • Fiancé and fiancée are always applied to a man or woman, respectively – in the same way you would have Mr and Mrs. Hair colour is a different issue.
  • edited June 2018
    I would use blond or blonde when referring to the person as in 'he/she was a ...'

    For the actual hair, would probably use blonde.

    (Noun vs adjective?)
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